Reviews

About the author

avatar

Jeremy Crooks

Jeremy grew up in Sydney Australia. He has tertiary qualifications in business, training, and Bible. With experience in both church ministry and corporate human resources, Jeremy has a strong interest in how faith is demonstrated in our homes and workplaces. You can contact Jeremy at jeremy@teaminfocus.com.au.

6 Comments

  1. avatar

    Jason Harris

    Thanks for that post Jeremy. I cringe at point four, but I think I know (and agree with) what you mean there. The post was excellent for me though. You’ve highlighted some real issues that I need to think about.

    Reply
  2. avatar

    Jeremy Crooks

    Jason,

    Yes I know what you mean about cringing at the term ‘Loving Yourself’. I too automatically think about the passages which describe our depravity and deceived hearts. (which are true). That part was well communicated to me through my IFB days. But in light of our redeemed value in Christ, I believe we should more frequently practice positive Biblical self-talk. God no longer views us as depraved but as saints. If we remind ourselves about how God values us – which is forgiven, redeemed saints with the power of the Holy Spirit – then I dare say we will be more joyful and productive.

    Reply
  3. avatar

    Peter Moroney

    Jeremy,
    When have we seen a similar movement in history? What did it look like? What where the results? The social media phenomenon looked at first to be synoptisicm, the medievil court culture ‘of the many watching the few’..but we are way past that. Your article agitates the concerns neatly and im thinking through your remedy.

    Reply
  4. avatar

    Jeremy Crooks

    Hi Pete,

    Interesting observation about previous movements in history. I suspect the scale and constancy of social media today is without historical precedent. Two sad event in the last week drive this home.

    1. Tragically, an Indian teen committed suicide when her parents told her she could not use facebook. She said she could not live without facebook. That is serious addiction.

    2. The public spat between Mark Dricsoll and John MacArthur’s conference. A silly dialogue over permission to distribute books has morphed into a event where Christianity and Jesus name is mocked by the world. This would not have been possible without social media.

    I am not saying social media is intrinsically evil, but its power is undeniable. And because of our sin nature, generally that power is used for evil. I don’t have the answer, but certainly would welcome your thoughts.

    Reply
    1. avatar

      Peter Moroney

      Hi Jeremy – I agree the times are unique, but also familiar – if only we would interpret it. Like you, I don’t think social media is intrinsically evil,any more evil than the printing press, rather has heaps of positivies. (though sometimes it feels like a torrent of false teaching Rev 12:15) Like anything, Its a matter of the heart – I remember studying intellectual property law and the lecturer impressed on us the “newness of the law” – really? isn’t it just do not steal, do not bear false witness, do not covet, do not commit adultery, Love the Lord your God etc.

  5. avatar

    Jeremy Crooks

    100% It is about the heart. There is nothing new under the sun in terms of the human condition. We will use whatever medium is available to further our desires. I was impressed with how this article (even from a secular perspective) encapsulates the social ‘battle for the mind’.

    http://thefederalist.com/2013/11/04/facebook-mobs-death-individuality/#.Unf7LKyJbXg.facebook

    Personally, I am pondering this issue deeply.

    1. As in real-life, if our online conversation is idle or unloving, it may be time to get new facebook friends.

    2. I like how you bring Revelation into the picture. Tech advancement does feel apocalyptic. The ubiquitous use of the smartphone (and soon to be Google glass) for commerce, feels like a ‘mark of the best’ embedded in our hands or foreheads. Again, I have a smartphone, so I am not saying it is evil, but way society worships ‘connectivity’ and its power to buy, sell and communicate is amazing. If we were to get rid of our smartphones, would we even be able to have a career? That point seems not far away.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Copyright © 2005-2016 by InFocus. Powered by WordPress. Effective News theme by Themelions Team.