Reviews
“The Pastor as Scholar & the Scholar as Pastor” by John Piper and D. A. Carson

“The Pastor as Scholar & the Scholar as Pastor” by John Piper and D. A. Carson

Piper, John, and Carson, D. A. (Strachan, Owen, and Mathis, David, eds.). The Pastor as Scholar and the Scholar as Pastor. Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2011. 111 pages. There are two dangers in ministry: intellectualism on one hand and anti-intellectualism on the other. In this book, two of the most powerful influences in my theological journey come together to address this very topic and do so with succinct clarity. The argument of the book is that pastors must think well and theological scholars must approach their work with a pastoral heart. I normally give "ups" and then "downs," but that format does not suit this book so I'll simply give some noteworthy points. First, this book is for two groups of people: Pastors and scholars in a theological context. Scholars in a secular context an ...

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“First Things First” by Stephen Covey

“First Things First” by Stephen Covey

Covey, Stephen R., Merrill, A. Roger, and Merrill, Rebecca R. First Things First. Sydney: Simon Schuster, 1994. 306 pages. Stephen Covey tackles time management, and as you might expect, he nails it. Covey argues for a fourth generation of time management that is principle-centred and focuses on importance rather than urgency. The ups First, when Stephen R. Covey writes, you can expect substance. I've read dozens of leadership/self-development books and few if any rival the writing of Covey. Second, Covey's time management matrix is a paradigm shifting tool that could change the way you look at your day, every day. It has the potential to free you from the tyranny of the urgent and free you up to do what is truly important with your life. Third, Covey moves well beyond time-saving gimmicks ...

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Lionel B. Fletcher

Lionel B. Fletcher

I was looking into the life of Australian evangelist Lionel B. Fletcher this afternoon and was amazed to discover that there was no Wikipedia entry for him. I then spent a considerable portion of said afternoon setting that right! I first "met" Fletcher at Bible college when we were assigned to write a review of a Christian biography. My lecturer, David Hill, singled me out and assigned me to read Fletcher's Mighty Moments (his autobiography). I'm glad that he did. I'm currently reading through another of Fletcher's books, Effective Evangelism and plan to read Malcolm's biography of Fletcher, Twelve Hours in a Day, soon. In the process of writing Fletcher's Wikipedia entry, I came across this stunning piece of information. According to Charles Malcolm, Fletcher's biographer, there were—con ...

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The Victim’s Acknowledgement

The Victim’s Acknowledgement

A lady tells her pastor's wife Lauren, “I wish I could talk to you about problems that I'm having in my marriage but I don't think you'd understand. Your marriage is so perfect and your husband is so gentle.” Lauren says something about how the Bible has all the answers. However . . . deep in her subconscious, something made Lauren feel like screaming, but she squelched it with, “Every marriage has some problems”. Horrifyingly, the hidden facts about Lauren's “perfect marriage” is that her pastor-husband intimidates, belittles, insults and orders her around just to control her and test her submission. He uses physical restraining, pushing, following her, locking her in the same room for hours while he rants on accusing her of false motives and actions, rapes her and even threatens her with ...

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So what about separation?

So what about separation?

So I've spent the week at Oxygen 2014 sitting under, and publicly engaging, the preaching of men like Don Carson, Francis Chan, John Lennox, Paul Tripp, and Bryan Chapell. But what about separation? What about contending for the faith? Doesn't the fact that some of these men hold to very different theology and some of them have hung out with guys who are really wrong on some stuff matter? How can I, in good conscience, attend, report, rejoice in, and even—I suppose—endorse these guys? These are the sorts of questions most people here at the conference wouldn't even think to ask. But which our readership might be more inclined to consider. And it is because I believe the motive of the question is good that I want to address it briefly here. First, I want to affirm the biblical doctrine of s ...

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